Wednesday, May 30, 2007
20 weeks 4 days
Girl A = 14 oz
Boy B = 15 oz
Boy C = 1 lb

The babies are all growing right on schedule. I'm also doing fine. There are no signs of premature labor, so that's a relief. Now it's time for me to lay down.
posted by lochan | link
5 comments and fresh takes

feeling crafty
Not Martha Stewart crafty. The girls won't say the word 'crap' (where they get their sense of decorum, I don't know, David and I are not the best examples) so Lillie says 'craft' instead.

Yesterday almost every time I stood up my stomach felt tight and I felt lightheaded and just kind of odd. So, I spent most of the day lying down, sitting, and napping. In the evening I felt closer to normal. Today I woke up feeling weird again except my stomach hurt worse. I threw up, took a nap, and now I'm feeling a little better. I even got a little work done.

I have a doctor's appointment today, which I'm very happy about. Hopefully they'll tell me this feeling in my stomach is a mix of growing babies and indigestion, not contractions.

I'm starting to feel little movements from the babies. Not the thump thump thump yet that I remember with the girls, but the early flutterings.

If I'm feeling up to it, I'll update after the appointment.
posted by lochan | link
2 comments and fresh takes

Friday, May 25, 2007
when it comes to the competition, i got none
I don't read much anymore. Nighttime used to be my time to read, but with this pregnancy it's my time to feel queasy and tired. In January I read Anne of Green Gables (at Grace's recommendation) and enjoyed it. I'm sure I would have loved it as a kid. I read Anne Tyler's Celestial Navigation and it was very good, but it took a little to get into it (everything and everyone was so musty and off, it just bothered me) and I was very dissatisfied with the ending. When I was first pregnant (but didn't know it yet), I read The Birthdays by Heidi Pitlor. It's a book about three siblings. The oldest son is dealing with his conflicting emotions about his wife's pregnancy (he is paralyzed and the wife was inseminated by a donor), the next oldest son's wife is pregnant with twins after IVF, and the youngest sister is pregnant but doesn't know who the father is. It was a good book, but not great. Each of the characters were very real, but flawed to the point where they were never very likeable.

After I found out I was pregnant with triplets, I read I Sleep at Red Lights by Bruce Stockler. It was a funny, enjoyable book about having triplets. I also read When You're Expecting Twins, Triplets, or Quads, which has proven to be a useful resource.

My latest read was Raising Multiple Birth Children and I enjoyed it, but it gave me much more of a sense of panic. Most of the book portrays life with triplets as insanely hectic and outrageously hard. I'm not saying that I think it won't be, but I'm looking for tips on how to reduce that, not a medal for what I'm going to go through. There was this attitude of look how hard I have it as a parent. I understand that to a point (get together with any group of mothers and eventually you'll hear all the horror stories about their labors - you go through something like that, you want to talk about it). But, frankly, I'm kind of tired of the whole idea that parenting is some sort of a competition.

One quote that really bothered me was "I laugh when I see those singleton parents who look like sleep-deprived marathon runners with one child in their grocery cart." Excuse me? How can this person assume her life as a triplet mother is always harder? She doesn't know anything about that "singleton" parent. Maybe she has four more kids at home. Maybe her baby has colic. Maybe she is totally sleep-deprived.

They also made a big deal about the fact that people will tell you that they have an idea of what you're going through because they had three little ones in diapers, but "it's not the same". Sure, it's not the same, but it's close. And, for many, maybe even harder. My sister-in-law at one point had a two year old, a one year old, and a newborn. That's beyond tough. My hairdresser (and my good blogging friend, Jen) had a young toddler and newborn twins. I think that could be harder than triplets, because one is mobile. They are in different stages, which would be really hard.

And, all babies are different. If I have three babies like Lillie (she was always very content and slept through the night at just a few months old) it will be very different from three babies like Grace (she cried a lot, didn't sleep through the night consistently until she was two, and I walked her for miles and miles).

I guess we're all just trying to make sense of the world. But, I'm tired of adults trying to one-up each other with their stuff and their hardships and their choices. I suppose all I can do is try not to fall into that myself. Talk to me in five months, I guess.
posted by lochan | link
6 comments and fresh takes

Friday, May 18, 2007
names and update
About three months before I got pregnant I had a dream that I had triplet boys. I told them that they could name themselves and the names they chose were: Joe, Joey and Joel. Uggh. I decided letting them name themselves was probably not a good idea. So, I decided to go with Will, Frank, and Elsa. (I don't like your name choice and you might just turn into a girl). Those are still my top names. Mainly because we can't agree on anything else. That, and every time we start talking about names it just turns into a game of finding the worst name ever. David spent about an hour one day trying to find a name that ends in -o that I would agree to (think Columbo).

Despite the dream, I was not expecting triplets. At all. Our doctor had told us that our chance of twins was 8% and our chance of triplets was less than 1%. Honestly, it was getting to the point where I wasn't expecting to have another baby at all.

We had another ultrasound this week (we'll have an ultrasound every two weeks from here on out and at some point it will move up to a weekly deal) and things looks good. I haven't gained as much weight as the books recommend, but the babies are measuring well (Girl A is 10 oz, Boy B is 10 oz, and Boy C is still Chancho at 11 oz), which is what matters. We had a very extensive ultrasound and everything looks good (as far as ultrasounds can tell), so that's a relief.

I'm still feeling queasy from time to time but I haven't thrown up in two weeks and I'm feeling much more normal. I get tired easily and I take naps every day. I'm starting to get big (at 18 weeks I look 6-7 months pregnant) and have times already when I can't get comfortable. I'm sure I haven't seen anything yet.
posted by lochan | link
6 comments and fresh takes

Tuesday, May 01, 2007
big news
Baby A = GIRL!
Baby B = BOY!
Baby C = BOY!

We're so excited we were able to find out! It's nice to be able to narrow down all the name possibilities a little bit. And, it makes everything seem a little more real.

I've got sick kids, so I can't write more.
posted by lochan | link
9 comments and fresh takes

Name: Laura

I have five kids including triplets. I'm too busy to blog, but I do anyway (uh, sometimes).

Learn more about me



My Antonia
by Willa Cather

June

Sarah's Quilt
by Nancy Turner

May

Maus
by Art Spiegelman


Housekeeping
by Marilynne Robinson

April

These Is My Words
by Nancy Turner


The Myth of You and Me
by Leah Stewart

March

Inconceivable
by Ben Elton


Songbook
by Nick Hornby


Follies
by Ann Beattie


Hungry Planet

February

About a Boy
by Nick Hornby


High Fidelity
by Nick Hornby


Stargirl
by Jerry Spinelli

January

Revolutionary Road
by Richard Yates


Morality for Beautiful Girls
by Alexander McCall Smith


A Long Way Down
by Nick Hornby


How to be Good
by Nick Hornby


Mere Christianity
by C. S. Lewis

December
Click here for a free Book of Mormon
The Book of Mormon

Good Faith
The Know-It-All
by A. J. Jacobs

Good Faith
Endurance
by Alfred Lansing

November
Good Faith
The Secret Life of Bees
by Sue Monk Kidd

September

Kite Runner
by Khaled Hosseini


The Good Earth
by Pearl S. Buck

August

Freedom of Simplicity
by Richard Foster


Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

July

Celebration of Discipline
by Richard J. Foster

Peace Like A River
Peace Like A River
by Leif Enger

Things Fall Apart
Things Fall Apart
by Chinua Achebe

Gap Creek
Gap Creek
by Robert Morgan

June
Life of Pi
Life of Pi
by Yann Martel

My Name is Asher Lev
My Name is Asher Lev
by Chaim Potok

A Prayer for Owen Meany
A Prayer for Owen Meany
by John Irving

All New People
All New People
by Anne Lamott

May
Patrimony
Patrimony: A True Story
by Philip Roth

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters
Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters
by J. D. Salinger

Good Faith
Good Faith
by Jane Smiley

Cradle and Crucible
Cradle and Crucible History and Faith in the Middle East
by National Geographic Society

April
Saturday
Saturday
by Ian McEwan

Blue Shoe
Blue Shoe
by Anne LaMott

Emma
Emma
by Jane Austen

Operation Shylock
Operation Shylock
by Philip Roth

March
Jane Austen: A Life
Jane Austen: A Life
by Claire Tomalin

To See and See Again
To See and See Again
by Tara Bahrampour

Reading L0l1ta in Tehran
Reading L0l1ta in Tehran
by Azar Nafisi

February
A Thomas Jefferson Education
A Thomas Jefferson Education
by Oliver Van Demille

Still Alive
Still Alive
by Ruth Kluger

The Screwtape Letters
Not The Germans Alone
by Isaac Levendel

Still Alive
World War II: A Photographic History
by David Boyle

The Screwtape Letters
The Screwtape Letters
by C.S. Lewis

Persuasion
Persuasion
by Jane Austen

January
Climbing Parnassus
Climbing Parnassus
by Tracey Lee Simmons

With the Old Breed
With The Old Breed
by E. B. Sledge

All But My Life
All But My Life
by Gerda Weissmann Klein

We Die Alone
We Die Alone
by David Howarth